OBGwhy

Women's Health Posted September 21, 2014 By 0 comments

Have You had your Mammogram this year?

It is pretty hard to miss that October is "Breast Cancer Awareness Month". Just about every store I walk into has a multitude of pink-colored items and special pink packaging with the awareness ribbon stamped on the front . On the television there are commercials to remind us of "pink October", sports teams wearing pink, and  news stories reminding us to have our mammograms done. The sobering statistics are that about 1 in 8 of us will eventually be diagnosed with breast cancer. That means that we all have somebody in our life who has been affected (or will be affected) by this disease.

My job as a physician is to educate you (my patients and friends) about the best ways to prevent disease, and  to try and catch disease early so that you will have a long, healthy life. There ARE some things that you can do to try to decrease your risk for breast cancer:

   Don't smoke! There is not much more to say about this except that it is terrible for your health in every way.

   Limit alcohol The more you drink, the higher the risk of breast cancer. Limit to one drink a day or less.

   Control your weight Obesity, especially after menopause increases your risk for breast cancer

   Breast-feed There is a protective effect- the longer, the better

   Exercise You need 150 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity, or 75 minutes of vigorous activity -plus strength training twice a week

   Limit dose and duration of hormone therapy Talk with your doctor about choosing the lowest dose for the shortest number of years

Do your breast self-exams monthly How else will you know if there is a new lump?

In order to detect breast cancer early, mammograms still remain the best test that we have. There has been a lot of confusion in the media lately about what age to start mammograms, and how often to have them done. In looking at all of these studies, we  still recommend to start yearly mammograms at age 40 and continue them for your whole life. There may be some of you that need to start testing earlier, but that will depend on medical and family history. Read More »

In the News Posted June 14, 2014 By

A Sad Day for Our Practice

On Friday, June 13,2014, our beloved Dr. Arnold Lazar passed away.

Dr. Lazar was co-founder of this practice. He  touched many lives and delivered thousands of babies in his 37 years with OB & GYN Specialists. He  held several leadership positions at Orlando Health, and has received many honors  throughout the years. To our practice, he was the dreamer, mentor, protector of  patients, voice of reason and fairness, and the "heartbeat" of  our group. He was an example of a physician that truly cared for his patients and their well-being, and was often the last  to leave the office each day because he spent extra time helping someone through a difficult time.

The funeral for Dr. Lazar will be Sunday, June 15 at 11:00 a.m.

    Temple Israel Cemetery
    9200 Morton Jones Road
    Gotha, FL 34734

In the News, Practice Updates Posted October 25, 2013 By 1 comment

Friendships: The Medicine of Life

I recently lost one of my best friends to cancer. I am overwhelmed with the amount of sadness I feel...nothing really prepares you for this. My friends are helping to ease the pain. You could argue that maybe this is because my partners in the practice (who are also my friends), are going through the same grief, and therefore we are commiserating with each other. But, my non-physician friends do just as great of a job in helping me to feel both physically and emotionally better, even without having that personal connection to my friend who passed away.

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Uncategorized Posted October 24, 2013 By 1 comment

Transforming new ways we care for our patients

“Wherever the art of medicine is loved, there is love of humanity” ~Hippocrates

When I joined this practice 18 years ago, I was fresh out of residency at Arnold Palmer Hospital and ready to use all of the medical knowledge I had learned over four grueling, sleepless years. I felt confident with my surgical skills, and felt that I could handle just about any obstetric emergency that came my way, diagnose any female-type rash or infection, and help women navigate the twisty turns of menopause. Dr. Marnique Jones and I came through the four years of residency together, and were fresh, 30 year old doctors eager to join this practice that Drs Diebel and Lazar had founded many years before. We were both busy from the start, and rapidly gained a large group of patients who would follow us both for many years to come.

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