OBGwhy

Uncategorized, Women's Health Posted July 8, 2017 By

“Meet the Docs” video series

This week we are highlighting Dr. Shawn Lee. He has been in practice with us since 2015.

Dr Lee is available to see patients at the Winter Park and Lake Nona office locations by calling (407) 644-5371.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGfWeDwMnYs

Uncategorized, Women's Health Posted March 19, 2017 By

New Office Location

We are pleased to announce that we are opening a new office location in Lake Nona! Our opening day is May 1st. You can call now to make your appointment : (407) 644-5371

9650 Lake Nona Village Place   Orlando,FL 32827                                 

Uncategorized, Women's Health Posted July 31, 2016 By

In defense of U.S. Healthcare-blog by Dr. Diebel

Last year I delivered the Presidential address to the South Atlantic Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in which I discussed the fact that the United States spends much more money on our health care than any other country in the world. In spite of this huge difference in spending, we don’t do as well as many other countries when we look at the statistics which measure quality such as life expectancy, perinatal mortality and many others. A report by the respected Institute of Medicine in 2013 revealed that we also have a higher number of people with chronic conditions such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, hypertension and heart disease. So it would seem at first glance that our health care system is not up to the same level as other developed countries around the world and we should be ashamed of it.

But first impressions can sometimes be deceiving and we need to look a little deeper.   Many of us have benefitted from “miracles of medicine” and survived conditions that once may have been fatal because of incredible scientific advances. We also have a huge and incredibly diverse population and one which has always welcomed immigrants and people from around the world. The other developed countries we have been compared with have much more homogeneous populations and are much smaller. Our population is larger than the combined populations of Australia, New Zealand, Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Canada, France, Germany, Netherlands, United Kingdom and Switzerland. With size comes many problems of the distribution of medical care and many issues of social inequality. Other major issues are related to personal choices and responsibility that people make to smoke, not exercise and take care of themselves in general. It is well known that there is a huge increase in chronic conditions associated with obesity and smoking. We shouldn’t blame the resulting illnesses on inadequate quality of our healthcare system for what are self-induced habits and life styles. An interesting statistic is that 5% of U.S. population account for 50% of the money spent on healthcare.

So I don’t think we should be quite so hard on ourselves and our healthcare system in the United States for being second rate. America is still the place people from around the world come to for their healthcare when facing difficult problems   The profession, which is made up of dedicated, caring individuals will continue to strive to improve the health of all our citizens as we always have. Our efforts need to be ongoing in trying to correct the social inequalities in our population, the access to healthcare and assist people in taking more responsibility for their own health with life style changes.

In the News, Practice Updates, Uncategorized Posted December 18, 2015 By

Top and Best Doctors!

Photo by Roberto Gonzalez

Congratulations to Dr's Carducci, Diebel, Jones and Logan for being voted "Best Doctors" in the December edition of Orlando Magazine.

Congratulations to Dr's Durkee and Jones for being named "Top Doctors" in the Orlando Magazine.

 

Women's Health Posted September 21, 2014 By 0 comments

Have You had your Mammogram this year?

It is pretty hard to miss that October is "Breast Cancer Awareness Month". Just about every store I walk into has a multitude of pink-colored items and special pink packaging with the awareness ribbon stamped on the front . On the television there are commercials to remind us of "pink October", sports teams wearing pink, and  news stories reminding us to have our mammograms done. The sobering statistics are that about 1 in 8 of us will eventually be diagnosed with breast cancer. That means that we all have somebody in our life who has been affected (or will be affected) by this disease.

My job as a physician is to educate you (my patients and friends) about the best ways to prevent disease, and  to try and catch disease early so that you will have a long, healthy life. There ARE some things that you can do to try to decrease your risk for breast cancer:

   Don't smoke! There is not much more to say about this except that it is terrible for your health in every way.

   Limit alcohol The more you drink, the higher the risk of breast cancer. Limit to one drink a day or less.

   Control your weight Obesity, especially after menopause increases your risk for breast cancer

   Breast-feed There is a protective effect- the longer, the better

   Exercise You need 150 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity, or 75 minutes of vigorous activity -plus strength training twice a week

   Limit dose and duration of hormone therapy Talk with your doctor about choosing the lowest dose for the shortest number of years

Do your breast self-exams monthly How else will you know if there is a new lump?

In order to detect breast cancer early, mammograms still remain the best test that we have. There has been a lot of confusion in the media lately about what age to start mammograms, and how often to have them done. In looking at all of these studies, we  still recommend to start yearly mammograms at age 40 and continue them for your whole life. There may be some of you that need to start testing earlier, but that will depend on medical and family history. Read More »

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